TRAIN TO TEACH

Teach SouthEast is an Initial Teacher Training (ITT) provider. Through Partnership with a range of schools, a high quality, bespoke School Centred Initial Teacher Training (SCITT) programme is delivered for aspiring secondary school teachers across the South East of England.

Led by two ‘outstanding’ schools, Salesian School in Chertsey and SJB in Woking, who are passionate about training and developing the outstanding teachers of tomorrow. Both schools are partners in the Surrey Teaching Schools Network (STSN) which has been licensed to deliver the National College Leadership Programmes. Jointly, they take a lead on the professional development of teachers, support staff and future leaders.

High-quality training enables all trainees to develop into confident and competent professionals. Trainees are well prepared through first-rate, complementary placements which ensure that they gain substantial practical experience, developing their evaluative and practical teaching skills effectively. This is within a Home school placement, four days a week, with the fifth day spent receiving General Professional Studies and subject specific training. In-school expert mentors and external subject trainers have consistently high expectations and work collaboratively to ensure training is coherent and highly relevant to the needs of trainees.

Due to Covid-19 we are currently unable to run our Taster Days in schools, but you can watch the narrated presentations that would normally be given by joining our Facebook group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/226130585241034/?source_id=1516027645302229

Alternatively, if you email Claire Brown on c.brown@sjb.surrey.sch.uk you will be sent a link to watch these in YouTube.

 

 

OFSTED said: ‘Visionary leadership has developed teacher training that produces very skilled teachers who are dedicated and reflective practitioners.’

‘The programme is making an invaluable contribution to the recruitment challenges in the local area and underpinning recruitment in some partnership schools.’